Archive July 2011

This is the Questions & Answers Archive
of the Sustainche Farm™ Forum web page
July 2011.

Enjoy exploring !

 

Submitted on 2011/07/27 at 12:42 pm | In reply to ManfredcheII.

Special thanks to Meme Tresia and H-Sustain !

We just received the precise figures of Sustainche Farm animals:
19 cattle, 20 goats, 12 chicken and 3 pigs – yes, we also have piggy

Cheers,
Sustainche, Lisa & the Sustainche Farm family

 

Submitted on 2011/07/26 at 11:32 am | In reply to ManfredcheII.

Hello Manfredche II & friends in Germany, thanks for your latest questions

1. How many unmarried males live on the farm; and the same refers to the females? At the moment one unmarried son and one unmarried daughter live on Sustainche Farm. The youngest son, however, is about to join the Namibian Defence Forces.

2. What kind of trees are the so called “House trees”? The House Trees are all fruit trees, such as palm tree, papaya tree and the huge shady omuye tree, with its fruits called oombe in Oshiwambo language.

3. What’s inside the shelter huts and the storage huts? The shelter huts are traditional wood construction with a reed grass roof and open to all sides. This is the place to sit and enjoy some shade when it is hot. In the reception
area’s shelter hut traditionally you find a big tree trunk to wait until you are invited to enter the house. The storage huts a closed construction made of Mopane (Colophospermun mopane) branches and interlaced with strips of Mopane bark. We’ll show you pictures with the upcoming Sustainche Farm™ products: The ‘Mahangu’ Episode

Enjoy your day,
Warm regards Sustainche, Lisa & the Sustainche Farm family

 

Submitted on 2011/07/25 at 9:34 am

Hallo Sustainche,

during the weekend I thought of some new questions )

How many unmarried males live on the farm; and the same refers to the females?

What kind of trees are the so called “House trees”?

What’s inside the shelter huts and the storage huts?

I think that is enough for today

Have a good time,
Manfredche II

 

Submitted on 2011/07/22 at 10:49 pm | In reply to ManfredcheII.

Well, Manfredche II,

Being registered you indeed ARE already a Sustainche Farm community member

Now, we only need to attract some more enthusiastic members like you are to support the Sustainche Farm project in Northern Namibia. We will be patient – today it is only 52 days into the ‘Motivation Phase’ or Project Preparation Phase I. We are very much on schedule. Tell your friends about the Sustainche Farm project and motivate them to subscribe for free, thus demonstrating their support. Feel free to utilize the wallpapers and posters in the media section of this website and share individual pages with your friends

Warm regards
Sustainche, Lisa & the Sustainche Farm family

 

Submitted on 2011/07/22 at 8:55 pm | In reply to ManfredcheII.

Hello Manfredche II & friends, indeed very interesting questions again

Wickerwork as well as pottery is traditionally produced by Meme Tresia for the Sustainche Farm domestic household. She is in particular well-known for her Oshoongo, which is utilized by Tate Fillipus for catching fish in the Oshanas, and for her flat plate-type wickerwork. The later is used for example for serving mahangu porridge. The material for wickerwork is found in the surrounding environment, such as reed grass and palm leaves.

The same refers to pottery. Meme Tresia finds the clay in the now dry bed of the nearby Oshana. It is traditional knowledge that this type of clay has some really amazing properties and Sustainche can only confirm: When you put some water in pottery bowl, it will be cooled. Guess what kind of mineral could be responsible for such a miracle … ?

The pottery you find under farm products of this website are all meant to serve the family’s food.

We hope that this answers your questions.

Enjoy your weekend as well – here it seems that we can enjoy a nice warm “winter” weekend with up to 29°C

Cheers, Sustainche, Lisa & the Sustainche Farm family

 

Submitted on 2011/07/22 at 4:54 pm

Manfredche  II wants to become a community member :)

 

Submitted on 2011/07/22 at 8:46 am

Hallo  Sustainche,

my next  questions )

What can I understand under pottery and wickerwork production? Where are the ingredients for the production from?

Is the production only for the domestic use?

Have a nice weekend

Manfredche II & friends

 

Submitted on 2011/07/21 at
5:26 pm
| In reply to ManfredcheII.

Hello Manfredche II & friends,

Being a true Sustainche Farm community activist, we very much appreciate all your questions which in total help us providing a comprehensive picture on Sustainche Farm in  Northern Namibia !

Warm  regards, Sustainche, Lisa & the Sustainche Farm family

 

Submitted on 2011/07/21 at
1:16 pm

Hallo Sustainche,

thank you for the detailed explanations.

Slowly but surely I become a idea of the life on Sustainche Farm. All this is
new for a “child” born in a town. )

I will reflect everything and then I come back with further questions.

Have a good time

Manfredche II

 

Submitted on 2011/07/21 at 11:42 am | In reply to ManfredcheII.

Dear
Manfredche II & friends in rainy Germany,

Thank you very much for voting and for your interesting new questions

1. How many cattle, goats and chicken are on the farm?

This answer is still pending and since we are prepared to provide realistic figures, we need some more time for elaboration

2. Does the farm have some cows, especially for milk?

There are cows on the farm but not really specifically for ‘milk production’. If cows have calves, Tate Fillipus milks them just for the supply of the children in the house. However, milking the cows is only done during rainy season.

3. Do they use/have goats-milk or -cheese?

There are goats on Sustainche Farm but goats are not milked. Consequently, there is no goats cheese.

4. Do they sell goats and cattle?

No, the Sustainche Farm family does not sell goats or cattle.

5. Can they slaughter their cattle or goats?

5.1. Tate Fillipus slaughters cattle only when there are big family celebrations such as weddings. You know, there are 10 children and five of them got married. Following our traditions Tate Fillipus needed to slaughter one cattle for each child that got married. When one of the extended family is getting married he can also support that family with one cattle.

5.2. Goats are only slaughtered for Christmas Eve celebration and also on the occasion when the family comes together. Some the children are working far away from the farm and therefore a family gathering is something special.

Enjoy your day, the Sustainche Farm family
Submitted on 2011/07/20 at 11:40 am

Mopani worm cooked in tomato and chilli sauce is very deliciouse, just try it.

Submitted on 2011/07/20 at 10:54 am

hallo Sustainche,

in the early morning I did my vote. Thanks for the detailed explications. Now my next questions:

Do the farm have some cows, especially for milk? Do they use/have goats-milk or -cheese?

Do they sell goats and cattle? Can they slaughter their cattle or goats?

Many greetings from a rainy Germany

Manfredche II

 

Submitted on 2011/07/19 at 1:08 pm | In reply to ManfredcheII.

Thanks, Manfredche II & friends,

Did we miss answering a question ? Shame on us !

So, the flooded farm house on the picture in section ‘Northern Namibia Flooding
2011’ is NOT Sustainche Farm ! Sustainche farm as indicated with a green star
on the ‘Location Analysis Map’ above is safely situated on a sand ridge and
this location is higher than any flooding event, even the record high flood of
2011. That’s in fact why Sustainche & Lisa prior to the selection of
Sustainche Farm prepared a ‘Location Analysis’

Sustainche Farm animals enjoy living outside during the entire year. This is
possible due to the favourable climate with minimum temperatures even now
during Winter-July not lower than 8-10°C. During the night cattle and goats
sleep together in the ‘cattle & goats house’ towards the eastern side of
the farm. This is an open space only enclosed with wooden poles and thorny bush
branches. Chicken have their nests in the vicinity of the ‘granary’ near the
farm house … there are always some mahangu grains to choose and pick. Lately
when it became quite chilly during early morning, Meme Tresia was only a bit
scared that the baby chicken would feel warm enough. However, Mama chicken took
care

Well, how many cattle, goats and chicken live on the farm ? In Africa this is a
very private question, the same like asking: “How much moneyski do you have on
your bank account, Manfredche II?” We need to ask Sustainche Farm family
whether they are prepared to provide precise figures and come back to you as
soon as possible

Have a nice day !

Sustainche, Lisa & friends

 

Submitted on 2011/07/19 at 12:28 pm

Hallo Sustainche,

here are my next questions. )

How many cattle, goats and chicken are on the farm? And do the animals live outside all over the year?

Then I miss your answer concerning the fact, that the picture of the flooding farm is the Sustainche Farm?

All the best to you and your friends.

Manfredche II

 

Submitted on 2011/07/18 at 6:13 pm | In reply to ManfredcheII.

Thanks, Manfredche II & friends,

Did we miss
answering a question ? Shame on us !

So, the flooded farm house on the picture in section ‘Northern Namibia Flooding
2011’ is NOT Sustainche Farm ! Sustainche farm as indicated with a green star
on the ‘Location Analysis Map’ above is safely situated on a sand ridge and
this location is higher than any flooding event, even the record high flood of
2011. That’s in fact why Sustainche & Lisa prior to the selection of
Sustainche Farm prepared a ‘Location Analysis’

Sustainche Farm animals enjoy living outside during the entire year. This is
possible due to the favourable climate with minimum temperatures even now
during Winter-July not lower than 8-10°C. During the night cattle and goats
sleep together in the ‘cattle & goats house’ towards the eastern side of
the farm. This is an open space only enclosed with wooden poles and thorny bush
branches. Chicken have their nests in the vicinity of the ‘granary’ near the
farm house … there are always some mahangu grains to choose and pick. Lately
when it became quite chilly during early morning, Meme Tresia was only a bit
scared that the baby chicken would feel warm enough. However, Mama chicken took
care

Well, how many cattle, goats and chicken live on the farm ? In Africa this is a
very private question, the same like asking: “How much moneyski do you have on
your bank account, Manfredche II?” We need to ask Sustainche Farm family
whether they are prepared to provide precise figures and come back to you as
soon as possible

Have a nice
evening !

Sustainche, Lisa & friends

 

Submitted on 2011/07/18 at 12:41 pm

Hallo
Sustainche,

here are my
next questions.

)

How many cattle, goats and chicken are on the farm? And do the animals live
outside all over the year?

Then I miss your answer concerning the fact, that the picture of the flooding farm
is the Sustainche Farm?

All the best
to you and your friends.

Manfredche II

 

Submitted on 2011/07/15 at 3:06 pm | In reply to ManfredcheII.

Thanks,
Manfredche II & friends, for your next questions …

which we imagine being questions of other community members as well

Mahangu is a
pearl millet (German: Hirse) typically grown in Northern Namibia and THE major
food basis. Without different ways of preparing mahangu we cannot imagine food.
All this is very healthy which also refers to the liquid products. We think
that mahangu & products is worth a special post ! In any case, have a look
to the ‘farm products’ pics section and watch out for ‘mahangu’.

Well: “Can
they sell their products or it is only for themselves?”

At the moment all the farm products are meant to supply the huge family, even
those family members in far away Windhoek who enjoy their home-grown mahangu

Never mind, the question
whether some of the products in surplus can and/or should be sold (and the
additional question is were … ?) is one of the challenges of the Sustainche
Farm project. Thus and for the time being, let’s leave this for future
discussion.

Love back to
Manfredche II & friends in Germany from Sustainche, Lisa & friends in
Namibia

 

Submitted on 2011/07/15 at 12:05 pm

Hallo to all
in Namibia,

thank you
for your explanations what it going on the farm.

Can they sell their products or it is only for themselves?

What kind of grain is mahungu, is it a kind of wheat?

love

Manfredche II

 

Submitted on 2011/07/14 at 9:17 pm | In reply to ManfredcheII.

Thanks,
Manfredche & friends, you are always welcome !

Warm regards, Sustainche & friends in Northern Namibia

 

Submitted on 2011/07/14 at 2:02 pm

Hallo
Sustainche,

thank your
for detailed explanation. I already saw the updates of the farm house

)

I think, there are always question, but first I will reflect your answers.

Afterwards I will ask again.

Have a good
time.

Manfredche
II an his friends

 

Submitted on 2011/07/13 at 5:59 pm | In reply to ManfredcheII.

Thanks,
Manfredche II, since we wanted to cross-check our answers, this time it took a
bit longer to post our reply.

It seems
that with the current update of the explanation of the farm house sketch map we
already anticipated some our your questions

The gray points in the farm house indicate a wooden construction which
separates different compounds of the homestead. You may identify a part of the
wood fence with the background image of the website. This is a very nice,
traditional solid way of construction and some of these parts are as old as 50
years. Originally, the entire farm house was surrounded by this type of wood
fence, but higher. Today, and since good quality mopane tree wood is hard to
find, the farm house is enclosed by a stone wall.

Concerning
the farm land: No, there is no fencing-off. Everybody knows the farm
boundaries.

Mother’s
Place is a stone constructed sleeping room for mother(s) and children. Today,
grandmother is sleeping there.

Father’s Place is a traditional wood constructed sleeping room or in Oshiwambo
language ‘ondunda you kulala’.

Without
going into too much details and risk the privacy, Tate Fillipus would also
consider the milk room (‘ondunda yomashini’) to be his place. On the other
hand, Meme Tresia is clearly is charge of the cooking room (‘okatala’) and area
as well as for the store rooms (‘elimba’).

We hope that
will answer your questions so far.

Warm regards to Manfredche II & friends from Sustainche & Lisa and the
Sustainche Farm family

 

Submitted on 2011/07/13 at 10:20 am | In reply to ManfredcheII.

Thanks,
Manfredche II, with the current photo shootings we will keep on updating the
pics

 

Submitted on 2011/07/13 at 10:01 am

Hallo
Sustainche,

here are my
next questions.

It concern the farm house and the farm map.

What means the gray points on the farm house map? I want to understand the
definition of “Father’s Place” and “Mother’s Place” ?

Is there a fence around the farm house, which material?

Is the whole farm delimit with a fence?

Thanks for
your explanations

Manfredche II and his friends from germany

 

Submitted on 2011/07/13 at 6:23 am

besides all,
I specially like the pictures of the website

 

Submitted on 2011/07/11 at 6:03 pm | In reply to ManfredcheII.

Thank you
Manfredche II, you’re very active

Originally, the farm of Meme Tresia and Tate Fillipus sustained 12 family
members, 10 children and the parents themselves. Although nowadays not all children
reside on the farm and have found their career outside, five family members
still live on Sustainche Farm™, one grandmother, the parents and two children.
Thus, you will find 3 generations on Sustainche Farm™. For more information we
kindly refer to the Sustainche Farm menu with its Basic Facts.

Warm regards to the Sustains™ community in Germany, Sustainche & Lisa

 

Submitted on 2011/07/11 at 1:53 pm

Hallo
Sustainche,

finally I
found your answer myself, thank you very much.

Now I have some other questions.

How many people live on the farm, how many generations?

How many persons can be supported from the farm?

Thanking you
in anticipation

Manfredche II

 

Submitted on 2011/07/10 at 5:31 pm | In reply to Yiazer.

Thank you
very much indeed, Yiazer, for your registration !

You were always among my greatest supporters and friends !

Warm regards from Sustainche Farm in Northern Namibia … and this includes Lisa

 

Submitted on 2011/07/10 at 2:48 pm

Marvellous
idea ! wish you a great success. Best regards

 

Submitted on 2011/07/10 at 12:34 pm | In reply to ManfredcheII.

Hallo
Manfredche II,

We have improved and updated the Sustainche Farm House sketch map !

Your wish is our command

Warm regards to you and company, Sustainche & Lisa

 

Submitted on 2011/07/08 at 10:50 am | In reply to ManfredcheII.

Hallo
Manfredche II,

Thank you very much for your kind comment and question!

Sustainche Farm covers about 8 ha as displayed on the GoogleEarth satellite
image farm map with maximum 400 m length West-East and 120 m length
South-North. The farm house is located in the Nord-Eastern corner of the farm
land. The GoogleEarth satellite image provides a small scale bar (91 m) in the
lower left corner.

Foccusing on the Farm House, GoogleEarth indeed does not provide a high
resolution satellite image. Sorry for that … we might change this in a rather
“pure” sketch map

The farm house as such
has a dimension of 30 m x 40 m. You may identify that there is not only one
“house”, but various houses and shelters. However, these are different rooms of
one homestead ! Thus, a Northern Namibian Owambo farm house at a first glance
might look different compared to a German farm family house … although the
function of the different rooms, like kitchen, bedrooms, etc. is identical.

Warm regards back to Germany, Sustainche

 

Submitted on 2011/07/08 at 8:57 am

Hallo
Sustainche and Lisa,

I want to know the dimension of Sustainche Farm.

The Photo of the Farm House is not quit well

(

Best regards from germany

Manfredche II

 

Submitted on 2011/06/24 at 10:07 am | In reply to Angelika.

Thanks !
Piece by piece Sustainche & Lisa will enjoy adding additional pics

 

Submitted on 2011/06/24 at 7:02 am

Guten
Morgen,

habe sofort die diversen Bilder, bzw. slide shows angeschaut. Super Bilder
dabei.

 

Submitted on 2011/06/20 at 10:12 am | In reply to Angelika.

German
“Gema” is of course something very special

Sustainche & Lisa can only recommend to search for “Salif Keita” on
youtube.com.

Enjoy your day, Sustainche & Lisa

 

Submitted on 2011/06/20 at 10:10 am | In reply to Angelika.

You wrote
the first comment on Sustainche Farm web site. Congratulations and many thanks
!

Warm regards, Sustainche & Lisa

 

Submitted on 2011/06/20 at 8:24 am

ich habe nun
diese Seite als Lesezeichen festgelegt.

)

 

Submitted on 2011/06/20 at 8:21 am

ich kann die
Musik nicht hören, die Gema unterstütz das Lied nicht, Schade

 

Comments are closed.